SMN Newsletter

 
 
 

28th May 2019

In this issue:

  • Time is nearly up – PhD project application deadline looming!

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2019 Update

  • Edinburgh CRF Mass-Spec Core Outreach

  • Vitamin D Animal Laboratory (VitDAL) receives DEQAS accreditation

  • Metabolomics on a microchip

  • Call for students to assist at BMSS40

  • TEAMS Symposium 2019

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Papers

  • Metabolomics (and other) Conferences and workshops

  • Webinars and Industry News

  • Acknowledgement

Twitter updates: #ScotMetNet


Time is nearly up – PhD project application deadline looming!

Age-related disease presents an economic burden, which might be addressed by keeping older people healthier for longer.  "Previous research has indicated that dysregulated energy metabolism within the carnitine shuttle is a primary driver behind ageing poorly. In this system, it is proposed that Vitamin E plays an important role as a chemo protectant in preventing reactive oxidation species (ROS) mediated peroxidation of fatty acids (FA)."

Nik Rattray and Dave Watson are hosting a PHD project to address this issue by "investigation of the chemo-protectant effect of Vitamin E throughout cellular fatty acid metabolism." The deadline for applications is Friday, May 31st, 2019.

So, get your skates on!See the full project description and how to apply here.


Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2019 Update

Congratulations and thanks to Nik Rattray and Dave Watson for securing £1500 funding from CBID for #ScotMetNet2019.

Wendy Niu from the Chemistry Biology Interface Division of the Royal Society of Chemistry said:

“CBID is happy to provide support for a meeting with a focus on support for early career researchers, and with a global audience.”


Edinburgh CRF Mass-Spec Core Outreach

Tom MacGillivray, Duncan Martin, Lee Murphy and Natalie Homer at NHS Lothian R&D Conference - photo by Marie Leslie

Tom MacGillivray, Duncan Martin, Lee Murphy and Natalie Homer at NHS Lothian R&D Conference - photo by Marie Leslie

Tom MacGillivray, Duncan Martin, Lee Murphy and Natalie Homer, pleased to win a poster prize at The NHS Lothian R&D Conference 2019 (organised by Edinburgh Accord) on ‘Success of Technology-based cores in Edinburgh Clinical Research Facility’.  The Edinburgh Accord Supports “University of Edinburgh clinical researchers in nurturing world class research and ensuring regulatory, ethical and scientific obligations are met”. @EdinburghACCORD.

The Mass Spectrometry Core also operated a ‘Stress Busters’ stand at the Scottish Parliament with Marisa Magennis and Ruth Morgan as part of the Edinburgh Science Festival in April 2019, communicating cortisol in humans, whales and horses through Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry to an unsuspecting public!


Vitamin D Animal Laboratory (VitDAL) receives DEQAS accreditation

Emma Hurst & Richard Mellanby, The Roslin Institute & R(D)SVS

Natalie Homer & Scott Denham, Mass Spectrometry Core, Edinburgh CRF, QMRI

University of Edinburgh

The Vitamin D Animal Laboratory (VitDAL) aims to provide a centre for research and diagnostics specialising in vitamin D biology in companion, production and wild animals. Recently, we have received DEQAS accreditation for our vitamin D LC-MS assay developed at the Mass Spectrometry Core (Edinburgh Clinical Research Facility, QMRI).

The VitDAL team at the Mass Spectrometry Core. R-L: Natalie Homer, Emma Hurst, Scott Denham & Richard Mellanby. Photo by Ruth Corrigan.

The VitDAL team at the Mass Spectrometry Core. R-L: Natalie Homer, Emma Hurst, Scott Denham & Richard Mellanby. Photo by Ruth Corrigan.

Numerous studies have recently linked vitamin D status to non-skeletal health and disease in veterinary species, including gastrointestinal, kidney, cardiac and infectious diseases, along with inflammation and cancer. The current challenge is to define whether vitamin D is causally linked to the initiation, development and outcome of these non-skeletal health disorders, or whether it is simply a marker of ill-health. VitDAL aims to further our understanding of vitamin D biology across multiple species, and to do so have harnessed mass spectrometry to resolve an unmet clinical and research need. We have utilised the facilities and expertise available at the Mass Spec Core to develop a vitamin D LC-MS assay. LC-MS is regarded as the gold-standard method for measuring vitamin D due to its selectivity and sensitivity. There are two forms of vitamin D, vitamin D2 which comes from plant-based sources, and vitamin D3 which comes from animal sources and is produced cutaneously in the skin of some species. Vitamin D2/3 are hydroxylated in the liver to 25-hydroxyvitamin-D2/3 (25(OH)D), and then further hydroxylated to 1,25a-dihydroxyvitamin-D2/3 (1,25a(OH)2D), the active metabolite, in the kidney. 25(OH)D2/3 are the main circulating metabolites and are used routinely to assess vitamin D status. Immunoassays, which were traditionally used to measure vitamin D, do not differentiate between the D2 and D3 versions. LC-MS/MS on the other hand, allows for the analysis of multiple analytes in a single sample, using a robust and reproducible assay that is highly selective and sensitive.

Working with Natalie Homer and Scott Denham at the Edinburgh Clinical Research Facility Mass Spec Core facility, VitDAL have developed and validated a 25(OH)D LC-MS assay that has now received DEQAS accreditation. DEQAS, the Vitamin D External Quality Assessment Scheme, aims to ensure the analytical reliability of vitamin D assays and is accepted by the College of American Pathologists (CAP) as a Proficiency Testing scheme for 25(OH)D assays. The organisation distributes five pooled human serum samples at quarterly intervals, which participating laboratories then measure using their chosen assay. Calculated concentrations of 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 are reported back to DEQAS and compared to target values assigned by the NIST Reference Measurement Procedure. A proficiency certificate is awarded annually if the lab meets the criteria set out by DEQAS, which states that 75% of samples analysed across the four batches must be within +/-25% of the NIST target value.

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In our first year of participation VitDAL have successfully met DEQAS criteria and have received a Certificate of Proficiency. This accreditation provides an assurance that our assay will produce accurate and reliable data and with this comes increased confidence in the work that we carry out. Continuous involvement in the DEQAS scheme will ensure that the assay maintains a high standard of quality, ensuring the reliability of our methods, materials and equipment. This has been an exciting journey which could not have been achieved without the fantastic expertise and facilities offered at the Mass Spec Core by Natalie, Scott and the Mass Spec Core team. We hope that this accreditation will aid in establishing VitDAL as the leader in comparative vitamin D analysis.

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Metabolomics on a microchip

Samadhan Patil, David Cumming, Mike Barrett.

University of Glasgow

Metabolomics technologies usually come as variations on either the mass spectrometry-based or NMR-based themes.  In each case expensive equipment that can only be housed in purpose built facilities is required.  At the University of Glasgow, researchers in the Polyomics facility and School of Engineering have joined forces to seek new ways to measure multiple metabolites simultaneously with technology that can bring metabolomics out of a facility setting and into the field.  It is an exercise in democratisation of metabolomics, allowing its use by a wider group of people across a broader range of settings.  The ultimate aim is to produce a device that can quantify panels of metabolites, for example those associated with specific diseases in settings including the home.

The Glasgow team’s approach uses multiple enzymes, capable of detecting individual metabolites on a silicon chip surface, within which sensors are embedded that can detect the output of those enzymatic reactions when their substrates are identified. The protypical design was published in Biosensenors and Bioelectronics late in 2018.

Patil, S.B. et al. (2018) An integrated portable system for single chip simultaneous measurement of multiple disease associated metabolites.Biosens Bioelectron. 122, 88-94.PMID: 30245326

Fig 1  A handheld prototype for the multiplexed assaying of metabolites.  (A) Prototype consisting of a post-processed CMOS-chip with electronic readout attached to an Android-based tablet for data acquisition. (B) The handheld device with CMOS-chip. (C) Side-view of the packaged structure. (D) Side-view, showing isolated  reaction zones  for assaying of four different metabolites with specific enzymes in individual micro-wells.

Fig 1

A handheld prototype for the multiplexed assaying of metabolites.

(A) Prototype consisting of a post-processed CMOS-chip with electronic readout attached to an Android-based tablet for data acquisition. (B) The handheld device with CMOS-chip. (C) Side-view of the packaged structure. (D) Side-view, showing isolated reaction zones for assaying of four different metabolites with specific enzymes in individual micro-wells.

The initial four concurrent metabolite measurements included xanthine, cholesterol, sarcosine and choline. Glutamate, glucose, lactate and creatinine, have all now been measured using the same device (Figure 1).  In each case, an oxidase specific for the metabolite of interest creates hydrogen peroxide in proportion to the concentration of its substrate. This in turn causes oxidation and colour change to o-dianisidine or phenol/aminoantipyrine in the presence of peroxidase. The colour change leads to absorbance of LED generated light passed through the reaction system and the loss of light is detected by photodiodes in the chip surface, thus allowing direct measurement of substrate concentration (Figure 2).

Fig 2.  Response of  photodiode   sensor array  from four micro-wells for  simultaneous detection  of four different metabolites. (A) Choline (25 μM to 500 µM) in diluted serum, (B) Xanthine (0.1 mM to 0.8 mM) in diluted serum, (C) Sarcosine(5 μM to 10 mM) in diluted urine, (D) Cholesterol (100 µM to 870 µM )in diluted serum. Photodiode signals are given in arbitrary unit s ( a. u.) The numerical variation in signal is measured in  millivolts  (mV) in every case.

Fig 2.

Response of photodiode sensor array from four micro-wells for simultaneous detection of four different metabolites. (A) Choline (25 μM to 500 µM) in diluted serum, (B) Xanthine (0.1 mM to 0.8 mM) in diluted serum, (C) Sarcosine(5 μM to 10 mM) in diluted urine, (D) Cholesterol (100 µM to 870 µM )in diluted serum. Photodiode signals are given in arbitrary unit s ( a. u.) The numerical variation in signal is measured in millivolts (mV) in every case.

Ultimately, as the Glasgow team work to increase the numbers of metabolite specific enzyme that are used on the chip surface there is a hope that a miniaturised approach to selected metabolite quantification can be created and removed from the reference lab to field based settings.  The technology needn’t be restricted to medical monitoring and work is already underway to design enzyme panels capable of measuring food impurities and environmental contaminants as well as medically useful biomarkers.


Call for students to assist at BMSS40

The BMSS40 organising team are seeking to recruit two student assistants to help deliver the biggest BMSS Annual Meeting in the society’s history!

OUTSTANDING OPPORTUNITY TO NETWORK AND BURNISH YOUR CV!

You will need to be at the RNCM, Manchester, from 10 am on Tuesday 3rd of September until 5 pm on Thursday 5th September. The work will entail staffing the registration desk, liaising with RNCM staff & BMSS40 delegates and supporting the sponsors/exhibitors.

To be eligible candidates will be required to submit an abstract to present their own research at BMSS40. Each Student Assistant’s workload will be scheduled to enable lecture and poster attendance at the meeting.

The two student assistants will receive free registration, a ticket to the conference dinner, B&B accommodation for up to 3 nights and travel expenses.Apply by 21st June 2019, sending a letter to admin@bmss.org.uk outlining your suitability and including your PhD supervisor’s name and contact details. More info


TEAMS Symposium 2019

The Edinburgh Association of Mass Spectrometrists (TEAMS) held their first Symposium in March, with 100 delegates in attendance from across Edinburgh.  The aim of the symposium was to introduce the diversity in application of mass-spec in Edinburgh and motivate the next generation of scientists (mostly biologists) to consider the questions made available to them by using the technology. 

A representative of each facility introduced their own technologies and hosted a session of presentations from facility users on how they’ve been using those technologies and what impact the approach has on their work. Obviously, metabolomics was a major feature.

TEAMS Symposium photograph by Norrie Russell

TEAMS Symposium photograph by Norrie Russell

For more information on TEAMS, visit the website: www.ed-mass-spec.ed.ac.uk  


Scottish Metabolomics Network Papers

·       Mori, K., Beauvoit, B.P., Biais, B., Chabane, M., Allwood, J.W., Deborde, C., Maucourt, M., Goodacre, R., Cabasson, C., Moing, A., Rolin, D., Gibon, Y. (2019). Central metabolism is tuned to the availability of oxygen in developing melon fruit. Frontiers in Plant Science (section Plant Metabolism and Chemodiversity).

·       Solopova, A., van Tilburg, A.Y., Foito, A., Allwood, J.W., Stewart, D., Kulakauskas, S., Kuipers, O.P. (2019). Engineering Lactococcus lactis for the production of unusual anthocyanins using tea as a substrate. Metabolic Engineering 54: 160-169.

·       Allwood, J.W., Xu, Y., Martinez-Martin, P., Palau, R., Cowan, A., Goodacre, R., Marshall, A., Stewart, D., Howarth, C. (2019). Rapid UHPLC-MS metabolite profiling and phenotypic assays reveal genotypic impacts of nitrogen supplementation in oats. Metabolomics 15: 42. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11306-019-1501-x

·       Allwood, J.W., Woznicki, T., Xu, Y., Foito, A., Aaby, K., Sungurtas, J., Freitag, S., Goodacre, R., Stewart, D., Remberg, S.F., Heide, O.M., Sønsteby, A. (2019). Application of HPLC-PDA-MS metabolite profiling to investigate the effect of growth temperature and day length on blackcurrant fruit. Metabolomics 15: 12. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11306-018-1462-5

·       Kallscheuer, N., Menezes, R., Foito, A., da Silva, M.H., Braga, A., Dekker, W., Méndez Sevillano, D., Rosado-Ramos, R., Jardim, C., Oliveira, J., Ferreira, P., Rocha, I., Silva, A.R., Sousa, M., Allwood, J.W., Bott, M., Faria, N., Stewart, D., Ottens, M., Naesby, M., Nunes dos Santos, C., Marienhagen, J. (2019). Identification of microbial production of the raspberry phenol salidroside that is active against Huntington’s disease. Plant Phys. 179: 969-985.

·       Scopelliti, A., Bauer, C. , Yu, Y., Zhang, T., Kruspig, B., Murphy, D. J. , Vidal, M., Maddocks, O. D.K. and Cordero, J. B. (2019) A neuronal relay mediates a nutrient responsive gut/fat body axis regulating energy homeostasis in adult Drosophila. Cell Metabolism, 29(2), 269-284.e10. (doi:10.1016/j.cmet.2018.09.021) (PMID:30344016) (PMCID:PMC6370946)

·       Greenwood, H. E. et al. (2019) Measurement of tumor antioxidant capacity and prediction of chemotherapy resistance in preclinical models of ovarian cancer by positron emission tomography. Clinical Cancer Research, (doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-18-3423) (PMID:30651275) (Early Online Publication)

·       Humpton, T. J., Hock, A. K., Maddocks, O. D.K. and Vousden, K. H. (2018) p53-mediated adaptation to serine starvation is retained by a common tumour-derived mutant. Cancer and Metabolism, 6, 18. (doi:10.1186/s40170-018-0191-6) (PMID:30524726) (PMCID:PMC6276204)

·       Oakey, L. A. et al. (2018) Metabolic tracing reveals novel adaptations to skeletal muscle cell energy production pathways in response to NAD+ depletion. Wellcome Open Research, 3, 147. (doi:10.12688/wellcomeopenres.14898.1) (PMID:30607371) (PMCID:PMC6305244)

·       McCormick, P. N. et al. (2018) Assessment of tumor redox status through (S)-4-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)-L-glutamic acid positron emission tomography imaging of system xc- activity. Cancer Research, (doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-18-2634) (PMID:30401715) (Early Online Publication)

Book chapters:

·       Newman, A. C., Labuschagne, C. F., Vousden, K. H. and Maddocks, O. D.K. (2019) Use of 13C315N1-serine or 13C315N1-methionine for studying methylation dynamics in cancer cell metabolism and epigenetics. In: Haznadar, M. (ed.) Cancer Metabolism: Methods and Protocols. Series: Methods in molecular biology (1928). Humana Press ; Springer: New York, NY, pp. 55-67. ISBN 9781493990269 (doi:10.1007/978-1-4939-9027-6_4)

·       Zhang, T., Labuschagne, C. F., Vousden, K. H. and Maddocks, O. D.K. (2018) Direct estimation of metabolic flux by heavy isotope labeling simultaneous with pathway inhibition: metabolic flux inhibition assay. In: Fendt, S.-M. and Lunt, S. Y. (eds.) Metabolic Signalling: Methods and Protocols. Series: Methods in molecular biology (1862). Humana Press: New York, pp. 109-119. ISBN 9781493987689 (doi:10.1007/978-1-4939-8769-6_8)


Metabolomics (and other) Conferences and workshops

date order

·       An Introduction to Omics, 29th – 30th May 2019, Glasgow Polyomics

o   2 day course

o   Please register through the website

·       9th European Network for Oxysterol Research (ENOR) Symposium

o   19-20th September 2019, Edinburgh, Scotland

o   Organisers Ruth Andrew and Natalie Homer

·       FRM-KJM9930 – NFIF - Bioanalysis - Forefront Technologies and Applications

o   A course in bioanalytical chemistry in Oslo for PhD students! A nice course to meet people and dig into cutting edge LC, MS, sample prep, etc.

o   October 14 - 18,  2019

 

Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2019, Glasgow

Clyde Arch, Glasgow Scotland (photograph courtesy of Giuseppe Milo   https://pixael.com/en/design-development-photography )

Clyde Arch, Glasgow Scotland (photograph courtesy of Giuseppe Milo

https://pixael.com/en/design-development-photography)

This year’s Scottish Metabolomics Network Annual Meeting will be held at the Technology and Innovation Centre (TIC) in Glasgow on Thursday 14th and Friday 15th November 2019. A statistics workshop will take place prior to this year’s meeting on Wednesday 13th November with limited places, so please book early.

You can download a flyer to display in your workplace.

Themes for this year’s symposium include

·        Human Health

·        Cancer Metabolism

·        Plant Metabolism

·        Biomarker Research

·        Microbial Metabolomics

·        Sports Metabolism

·        Nutritional Metabolomic

·        Lipidomics

·        Advantages in Technology.

The evening drinks reception will be held at the Drygate Brewery followed by conference meal and Ceilidh. Registration is expected to open in July so please save the date! Inquiries to D.G.Watson@strath.ac.uk and Nicholas.Rattray@strath.ac.uk please.


Webinars and Industry News

·       Crawford Scientific has just published new on-site and off-site Training programmes for 2019. Please visit https://www.crawfordscientific.com/training-consultancy/book-a-course to download a brochure or request pricing.

·       Shimadzu have released a combined package of Maldi and qtof. https://www.shimadzu.co.uk/powerful-combination


Acknowledgement

This is my first time coordinating the newsletter. Many thanks to those who helped with the transition, especially our previous coordinator, Sabine Freitag.  Sabine has obviously done a stellar job with the newsletter and the handover was excellent.

Photographs:

1.       CRF @EdinburghACCORD photo by Marie Leslie

2.       VitDAL team photo by Dr Ruth Corrigan

3.       TEAMS Symposium photograph by Norrie Russell

4.       Clyde Arch, Glasgow Scotland by Giuseppe Milo

Thanks to everyone for your contributions. Any corrections or last-minute updates for the web version, let me know jimi.wills@ed.ac.uk.


 

Previous Newsletters

15th February 2019 

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2019 Advert (Nik Rattray & David Watson)

  • The 5th Annual IBioIC Conference (from Alison Hughes, University of Strathclyde)

  • The Chemistry and Biology of Natural Products Symposium (CBNP) XII (from Laia Castano Espriu, University of Strathclyde)

  • Improving our sample preparation workflow by automation using a Biotage Extrahera Robot (by Scot Denham, Edinburgh CRF)

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Papers

  • Upcoming Metabolomics (and other) conferences

  • Acknowledgement


November 2018 Newsletter

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2018

o   Special (Will Allwood)

o   Technical Overview (Hannah Florance)

o   Biology Overview (Gavin Blackburn)

  • Laboratory of the Quarter: Beatson Institute, Cancer Research UK (from Gillian MacKay)

  • Mass Spectrometry Applications in the Clinical Laboratory (MSACL) 2018 EU

o   Course Overview (by Nina Denver)

o   Course Summary (by Emma Hurst)

  • Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Technical Conference 2018 (from Scott Denham)

  • Peter Derrick Memorial Symposium ACS August 2018 (from Ruth Andrew)

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Papers

  • Awarded PhD studentship and grants

  • Upcoming Metabolomics (and other) conferences

  • Vacancies

  • Acknowledgement


AUGUST 2018 Newsletter

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2018 Advert (from Will Allwood and Jeffery Huang)

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Lab Visit Training Grants for Early Career Researchers 2018

  • Laboratory of the Quarter: Glasgow Polyomics Facility (from Karl Burgess)

  • Core Technologies in Life Sciences (CTLS) Conference 2018 in Ghent (from Natalie Homer)

  • Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Metabolomics Course (from David Sumpton)

  • Notes from our Sponsors: Chromatographic Deconvolution (from John Moncur, SpectralWorks Ltd.)

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Papers

  • Awarded PhD studentships and grants

  • Upcoming Metabolomics (and other) conferences

  • Webinars

  • Further Announcements

  • Vacancies

  • Acknowledgements


May 2018 Newsletter

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2018 Advert (from Will Allwood and Jeffery Huang)

  • Laboratory of the Quarter: The Edinburgh Clinical Research Facility Mass Spectrometry Core (from Ruth Andrew and Natalie Homer)

  • Metabolomics Workshops at the African Centre for Gene Technologies (from Karl Burgess)

  • A Novel Metabolomics Method Developed by the Dundee Team (from Jeffrey Huang)

  • Symposium on Informatics for Stratified Medicine and Biomarker Discovery (from Naomi Rankin)

  • Technical Managers in Universities Conference (from Natalie Homer)

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Papers

  • Metabolomics (and other) conferences

  • PhD Opportunities

  • Vacancies

  • Acknowledgements


February 2018 Newsletter

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2018 Advert (from Will Allwood and Jeffery Huang)

  • Laboratory of the Quarter: Lipidomics (and Proteomics) Research Facility at the University of the Highlands and Islands, Inverness (from Phil Whitfield)

  • Metabolomics Profiling Forum 2017 Birmingham Overview (from Karl Burgess)

  • Metabolomics Training at EMBL-EBI (Naomi Rankin)

  • Edinburgh CRF MS Core Update (from Ruth Andrew)

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Papers

  • Metabolomics (and other) conferences

  • PhD studentships

  • Vacancies

  • Acknowledgements


 

November 2017 Newsletter

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2017 Special

    • Overview (Ruth Andrew)

    • Technical Sessions (Ruth Andrew and David Watson)

    • Biology Sessions (Ruth Andrew and Kevin Rattigan)

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2018 Advert (Will Allwood and Jeffery Huang)

  • Laboratory of the Quarter: Hutton Environmental and Biochemical Sciences Group LC- and GC- MS metabolomics, lipidomics and volatile analysis facilities, James Hutton Institute (from Will Allwood)

  • Edinburgh Update (from Natalie Homer)

  • UK Clinical Research Facilities Network (from Natalie Homer)

  • Synthetic Biology Workshop in China (from Karl Burgess)


 

August 2017 Newsletter

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2017 Update (Naomi Rankin and Gavin Blackburn)

  • Laboratory of the Quarter: Cell Metabolism and Homeostasis Group and Metabolomics/Lipidomics Mass Spectrometry Group at the Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine (IGMM) (from Andy Finch)

  • Edinburgh Update (from Ruth Andrew and Natalie Homer)

  • UK Clinical Research Facilities Network (from Natalie Homer)

  • EPSRC UK National Mass Spectrometry Facility 30th Anniversary Symposium (from Natalie Homer)

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Papers

  • Metabolomics (and other) conferences


May 2017 Newsletter

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2017 Update (Naomi Rankin and Gavin Blackburn)

  • Metabolomics Training in South Africa (Karl Burgess)

  • NMR metabolomics training at EMBL-EBI (Naomi Rankin)

  • Updates from Edinburgh (Ruth Andrew)

  • Updates from the University of Glasgow (Naomi Rankin and Karl Burgess)

  • Papers from the Scottish Metabolomics Network

  • Metabolomics and other conferences


December 2016 Newsletter

Special issue on the Scottish Metabolomics Symposium 2016 in Inverness:

  • Overview (from Karl Burgess and Naomi Rankin)

  • Biology Sessions Overview (from Andrew Finch)

  • Technical Sessions Overview (from Natalie Homer)


September 2016 Newsletter

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Updates (Karl Burgess)

  • Update on Symposium 2016 (Phil Whitfield)

  • Core expansion at Edinburgh CRF (Ruth Andrew)


 
 

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