SMN Newsletter

 
 
 

17th May 2018

Overview  

·         Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2018 Advert (from Will Allwood and Jeffery Huang)

·         Laboratory of the Quarter: HuttonThe Edinburgh Clinical Research Facility Mass Spectrometry Core (from Ruth Andrew and Natalie Homer)

·         Metabolomics Workshops at the African Centre for Gene Technologies (from Karl Burgess)

·         A Novel Metabolomics Method Developed by the Dundee Team (from Jeffrey Huang)

·         Symposium on Informatics for Stratified Medicine and Biomarker Discovery (from Naomi Rankin)

·         Technical Managers in Universities Conference (from Natalie Homer)

·         Scottish Metabolomics Network Papers

·         Metabolomics (and other) conferences

·         PhD Opportunities

·         Vacancies

·         Acknowledgements

 

For twitter updates search for #ScotMetNet


Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2018 Advert (from Will Allwood and Jeffery Huang)

The next Scottish Metabolomics Symposium will be held at the Discovery Point Exhibition Centre on Thursday the 1st and Friday the 2nd of November 2018. More information will be on the website (events page) soon. At the moment you can download a flyer to display in your workplace and a link to the Dundee and Angus Convention Bureau were you can get more information about Dundee. Look out for the poster abstract deadlines and early bird registration deadlines that will be announced in the next month or so.

Themes will be metabolomics technologies, cancer metabolomics, lipidomics, food and crop chemistry and nutrition and metabolomics in biomarker research. The evening drinks reception will be held on board the RSS Discovery followed by the conference dinner. Enquiries to will.allwood@hutton.ac.uk and wtcrf.education@ed.ac.uk

We look forward to welcoming you to Dundee. For updates follow #ScotMetNet on Twitter.

 Photograph of the RRS Discovery and the Discovery Point Exhibition Centre ( http://www.rrsdiscovery.com)

Photograph of the RRS Discovery and the Discovery Point Exhibition Centre (http://www.rrsdiscovery.com)


Laboratory of the Quarter: The Edinburgh Clinical Research Facility Mass Spectrometry Core (from Ruth Andrew and Natalie Homer

Overview

The “MS Core” is one of the Scientific Cores embedded in the Edinburgh Clinical Research Facility. Initially conceived under an Infrastructure grant by the Wellcome Trust, it has expanded its instrumentation under successive equipment bids from the same charity. Its mission is to provide analytical chemistry support for the clinical research community, with involvement from preclinical proof-of-concept to Phase 2 clinical studies.

 Photograph of Scott Denham, post doc Shazia Khan and PhD student with Craig Murphy during installation of the ECRF MS Core Imaging Mass spectrometer Waters Synapt instrument (photograph courtesy of Natalie Homer)

Photograph of Scott Denham, post doc Shazia Khan and PhD student with Craig Murphy during installation of the ECRF MS Core Imaging Mass spectrometer Waters Synapt instrument (photograph courtesy of Natalie Homer)

The lab started in 1997 with a GC-MS, focussing heavily on stable isotope tracers in endocrinological studies. Our Voyager GC-MS is still running, but is now complemented by a GC-MS/MS triple quad, Quantum Ultra. We invested in our first LC-MS-MS in 2003, which was a TSQ Quantum, a favourite of our Core Manager. It is still functional, although destined for a lab in Bangladesh supporting toxicological research. These days we have Qtrap6500+ and 5500 systems and a Xevo TQS offering highly sensitive quantitation and additional features such as microLC and 2D chromatography. We have recently moved into the accurate mass and ion mobility arena with the installation of a Synapt G2Si in 2018, following an extensive refurbishment and are setting up surface sampling by DESI and MALDI for Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

 Left to right: Scott Denham, Daryl Ainsworth (visiting post grad from Glasgow Uni), Dr Edward Bower, Dr Emma Hurst (post doc researcher from Roslin institute), Nina Denver (visiting PhD student from Glasgow Uni), Natalie Homer, John Stewart (modern apprentice) (photograph courtesy of Natalie Homer)

Left to right: Scott Denham, Daryl Ainsworth (visiting post grad from Glasgow Uni), Dr Edward Bower, Dr Emma Hurst (post doc researcher from Roslin institute), Nina Denver (visiting PhD student from Glasgow Uni), Natalie Homer, John Stewart (modern apprentice) (photograph courtesy of Natalie Homer)

Our Core hosts a group of MS specialists. Natalie Homer, a chemist, began as a post-doctoral research assistant in 2002 and has managed the Core since 2004. She has a particular interest in targeted small molecule applications by LC-MS/MS, broadening assays to follow metabolic pathways such as Tryptophan pathway and paracetamol metabolism and embracing the analytical challenges that each clinical study presents. Our current Deputy Manager, Scott Denham, worked in Edinburgh University from graduation and spent 4 years in the MS core as a technician. He then moved to industry for 8 years, becoming skilled in LC applications at contract research organisations, gaining expertise in industry standard reporting, bioanalytical validation and working within regulated environments. He returned to the MS core in January 2018.

We have the excellent support of technicians, Tricia Lee and Alison Rutter and a Modern Apprentice, John. Our latest recruit is Shazia Khan, whose role is to establish Mass Spectrometry Imaging projects. Shazia is a natural product chemist, with experience in ‘omics, spending time with Dave Watson in Strathclyde prior to her move to Edinburgh. Finally, our Core Director, Ruth Andrew, has a passion for steroid analysis, expertise in stable isotope tracer pursuing derivatisation approaches to measure trace levels. Commonly we support several students and post-docs in their studies.

 Photograph of Tricia Lee the great lab technician at the ECRF MS core (photograph courtesy of Natalie Homer)

Photograph of Tricia Lee the great lab technician at the ECRF MS core (photograph courtesy of Natalie Homer)

Together the team support a diverse array of science. Recent examples of projects include assessing biomarkers of drug efficacy in a Phase 2 trial in Alzheimer’s disease and also another establishing a novel treatment for acute pancreatitis. We are involved in profiling glucocorticoid and androgen metabolism in diverse disorders e.g. premature birth, type 2 diabetes, cognitive decline with ageing. We support comparative biology, evaluating metabolic disorders in horses, assessing nutritional status in dogs and sheep and reproductive cycles in the Edinburgh panda. Lastly, we play a critical role in the data packages for novel patents.

 Photograph of Scott Denham, ECRF MS Core deputy manager working with Sofia Laforest a visiting PhD student from Quebec (photograph courtesy of Natalie Homer)

Photograph of Scott Denham, ECRF MS Core deputy manager working with Sofia Laforest a visiting PhD student from Quebec (photograph courtesy of Natalie Homer)

Some of our highlights include:

1)    Leverrier-Penna S, Mitchell RT, Becker E, Lecante L, Ben Maamar M, Homer N, Lavoué V, Kristensen DM, Dejucq-Rainsford N, Jégou B, Mazaud-Guittot S. Ibuprofen is deleterious for the development of first trimester human fetal ovary ex vivo. Hum Reprod. 2018 Feb 2

2)    Cobice DF, Livingstone DE, McBride A, MacKay CL, Walker BR, Webster SP, Andrew R (2017) Quantification of 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 kinetics and pharmacodynamic effects of inhibitors in brain using Mass Spectrometry Imaging and stable-isotope tracers in mice. Biochemical Pharmacology. 148:88-99.

3)    Webster SP, McBride A, Binnie M, Sooy K, Seckl JR, Andrew R, Pallin T, Hunt H, Perrior T; Ruffles, V, Ketelbey J, Boyd A, Walker BR (2017) Selection and early clinical evaluation of the brain-penetrant 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) inhibitor UE2343 (Xanamem®) (2017) British Journal of Pharmacology, 174(5):396-408.

4)    Morgan et al., Carbonyl reductase 1 catalyzes 20β-reduction of glucocorticoids, modulating receptor activation and metabolic complications of obesity Scientific Reports volume 7, Article number: 10633 (2017)

5)    Vliegenthart A, Kimmitt RA, Seymour JH, Homer NZ, Clarke JI, Eddleston M, Gray A, Wood DM, Dargan PI, Cooper JG, Antoine DJ, Webb DJ, Lewis SC, Bateman DN, Dear JW. Circulating acetaminophen metabolites are toxicokinetic biomarkers of acute liver injury. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2017 Apr;101(4):531-540. 

6)    Morton et al., Genetic identification of thiosulfate sulfurtransferase as an adipocyte-expressed antidiabetic target in mice selected for leanness. Nat Med. 2016 Jul;22(7):771-9

7)    Mole DJ, Webster SP et al. including Homer NZ (2016) Inhibition of kynurenine-3-monooxygenase activity protects against multiple organ failure in rodent models of severe acute pancreatitis. Nat Med. 22 (2): 202-9 PMID: 26752518

8)    Nixon M, Mackenzie SD, Taylor AI, Homer NZ, Livingstone DE, Mouras R, Morgan RA, Mole DJ, Stimson RH, Reynolds RM, Elfick AP, Andrew R, Walker BR (2016) ABCC1 confers tissue specific sensitivity to cortisol versus corticosterone: A rationale for safer glucocorticoid replacement therapy. Sci Transl Med. 8: 352 PMID:27635620

9)    Van den Driesche S, Macdonald J, Anderson RA, Johnston ZC, Chetty T, Smith LB, McKinnell C, Dean A, Homer NZ, Jorgensen A, Camacho-Moll ME, Sharpe RM, Mitchell RT. (2015) Prolonged exposure to acetaminophen reduces testosterone production by the human fetal testis in a xenograft model. Sci Transl Med. 20;7(288). PMID:25995226.

10)  Boonen E, Vervenne H, Meersseman P, Andrew R, Mortier L, Declercq PE, Vanwijngaerden Y-M, Spriet I, Wouters PJ, Perre SV, Langouche L, Vanhorebeek I, Walker BR, van den Berghe G (2013) Reduced cortisol metabolism during critical illness. New England Journal of Medicine, 368, 1477-1488.

11)  Cobice D, MacKay C, Goodwin R, McBride A, Langridge-Smith P, Webster S, Walker B, Andrew R (2013) MS imaging for dissecting steroid intracrinology within target tissues. Anal Chem, 85, 11576-11584. PMID:24134553; PMC4392804.


Metabolomics Workshops at the African Centre for Gene Technologies (from Karl Burgess)

Three and a bit years ago, I was having breakfast with Steffen Neumann and Reza Salek at the 2015 San Francisco Metabolomics Society Conference. It was the first time I'd met Reza and he almost immediately asked me if I'd like to be involved in a training course in South Africa. I was delighted to be asked, said yes, and expected to never hear anything further about it. Around 6 months later, Reza got in contact again, along with the local organisers Farhahna Allie and John Becker. We were suddenly booking flights for early March. The hospitality of John and Farhahna, and the incredible local metabolomics community, especially Ian Dubery, Fidele Tzugizimana and Edwin Madala meant that I suspect I learned more than I taught, and we were incredibly keen to return and expand the training in the following year. It's fast become one of the highlights of my year.

 Naomi Rankin, Karl Burgess, Fabien Jourdan, Jos Hagemann, Fidele Tzugisimana and Reza Salek at the University of Pretoria (photograph courtesy of Molati Nonyane.

Naomi Rankin, Karl Burgess, Fabien Jourdan, Jos Hagemann, Fidele Tzugisimana and Reza Salek at the University of Pretoria (photograph courtesy of Molati Nonyane.

In March this year, Naomi Rankin and I from the SMN, with Reza Salek, Fabien Jourdan and Jos Hagemann, joined John Becker, Molati Nonyane, Fidele Tzugisimana, and Paul Steencamp at TUKS (The University of Pretoria) for our third training course in metabolomics. This year we separated the course into a three-day introduction and a two-day advanced course. It gave us an opportunity to provide a more applications focused course in the first half, and then to dig into tutorials and practical data analysis exercises in the last two days.

I covered the applications of metabolomics to Industrial Biotechnology - South Africa has a clear IB policy, vast and diverse natural resources, and a skilled workforce in the brewing and natural products industries. It would be fantastic to develop an international partnership in the area, and I look forward to a growing collaboration over the next few years. As always, we returned excited about our next trip, not just in terms of how we can refine and improve our teaching and its impact, but also to spend time in the company of good friends.

I owe a particular debt to Dr John Becker, Centre Manager for the African Centre for Genome Technologies, who has made this a true success from the beginning, and to Thermo Fisher Scientific, who have been kind enough to support travel for Naomi and I, and the donation of a PicoSpin benchtop NMR for the week, which allowed us to provide hands-on access to NMR for the students.

 Naomi Rankin demonstrating the PicoSpin benchtop NMR spectrometer to the Metabolomics Workshop Attendees (photograph courtesy of Karl Burgess)

Naomi Rankin demonstrating the PicoSpin benchtop NMR spectrometer to the Metabolomics Workshop Attendees (photograph courtesy of Karl Burgess)

I would particularly like to thank Molati Nonanye from ACGT for organising us (no mean feat!) and Salome Smit from AnaChem for providing us with an excellent closing presentation.


A Novel Metabolomics Method Developed by the Dundee Team (from Jeffrey Huang)

Dr Huang and his team at Biomarker and Drug Analysis Core Facility, University of Dundee have developed a hybrid metabolomics workflow (termed isotope dilution targeted/non-targeted profiling (or ID-TNT profiling) that can address pitfalls of the current metabolomics workflow.

  University of Dundee logo ( https://www.dundee.ac.uk )

 University of Dundee logo (https://www.dundee.ac.uk)

Traditionally, the targeted metabolomics analysis focuses on a few analytes of interest and is usually well-validated in terms of analytical performance but lacks the ability of screening non-targeted analytes. On the other hand, non-targeted profiling (e.g. label-free) provides semi-quantification capability on all detectable ions but their analytical performance is difficult to assess due to high number of analytes and unknown identities of many detected signals. 

 

 Reprinted with permission from ACS Publications from Isotope Dilution-Based Targeted and Nontargeted Carbonyl Neurosteroid/Steroid Profiling, Anal. Chem.,  2018 , 90 (8), pp 5247–5255.  DOI:  10.1021/acs.analchem.8b00055. Copyright 2018 American Chemical Society.

Reprinted with permission from ACS Publications from Isotope Dilution-Based Targeted and Nontargeted Carbonyl Neurosteroid/Steroid Profiling, Anal. Chem., 2018, 90 (8), pp 5247–5255. DOI: 10.1021/acs.analchem.8b00055. Copyright 2018 American Chemical Society.

This ID-TNT profiling was designed to have your cake and eat it. This approach maintains the ability to quantify targeted molecules with high confidence via stable isotope dilution, and simultaneously offers a capability to examine non-targeted molecules similar to non-targeted metabolomic profiling. This additional profiling capability allows systematic, or retrospective analysis for changes unforeseen during the planning stage as demonstrated in the acute stress and pharmacological experiments shown in this study. Conversely, the data from targeted analyses provides an empirical way to judge the suitability of normalization strategy such that false positive and false negative results can be minimized. Furthermore, it would enable PK/PD analysis in the same analysis. Last but not least, the ID-TNT approach would also allow an assay to be validated in a way acceptable by regulatory bodies (e.g. The Food and Drug Administration), without compromising the screening capability. This approach would resolve a critical issue of validating metabolomics methods, where the number of analytes is too prohibitive to be validated in a traditional manner.

In collaboration with Professor Lambert, the team applied this workflow to the analysis of neurosteroids, brain-derived steroids that are capable of rapidly modulating neuronal excitability in a non-genomic manner. Neurosteroids are known to involve in a number of physiological responses including stress, cognition, and in many diseases including anxiety, neurodegenerative diseases, drug and alcohol abuse, epilepsy, depression and obesity.

Through this new workflow, this study also made several novel discoveries, including a striking increase of brain pregnenolone following finasteride administration. This discovery may be important for understanding mechanisms underpinning the pharmacological effects and adverse effects of finasteride. The team is now seeking to apply the workflow in the clinical study.

This paper is published in Analytical Chemistry. If you are interested in the study or the method, the paper is available online via the link (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29561593). Please contact Jeffrey Huang (tel: (3)836901; email j.t.j.huang@dundee.ac.uk) for further information.

 Photograph of Dr Jeffrey Huang (courtesy of Dr Jeffrey Huang)

Photograph of Dr Jeffrey Huang (courtesy of Dr Jeffrey Huang)


Symposium on Informatics for Stratified Medicine and Biomarker Discovery (from Naomi Rankin)

Naomi Rankin, from the University of Glasgow and part of Glasgow Molecular Pathology Node, presented at the "Informatics for Stratified Medicine and Biomarker Discovery: A Molecular Pathology Informatics Network Symposium" in Manchester on the 8th of March 2018. Her presentation included an overview of the associations between circulating amino acids and risk of complications in individuals with T2DM in the ADVANCE trial (Welsh and Rankin, et al., Diabetologia 2018; DOI 10.1007/s00125-018-4619-x, link below).

 Naomi Rankin presenting at the Informatics for Stratified Medicine and Biomarker Discovery: A molecular Pathology Informatics network Symposium (photograph courtesy of Nophar Giefman)

Naomi Rankin presenting at the Informatics for Stratified Medicine and Biomarker Discovery: A molecular Pathology Informatics network Symposium (photograph courtesy of Nophar Giefman)

This successful symposium was organised by Nophar Giefman from the Division of Informatics, Imaging & Data Sciences at the University of Manchester. There were 12 presenters in total and 64 registered attendees. Professor Anthony Whetton, Director of the Stoller Biomarker Discovery Centre at the University of Manchester started off the symposium with an excellent keynote speech on the role of Proteomics in Precision Medicine. In it he highlighted the difficulty in translating novel biomarkers from the research environment to the clinical environment, a sentiment echoed by Naomi in her presentation on the use of NMR metabolomics in biomarker discovery.

 Welcome slide from the Informatics for Stratified Medicine and Biomarker Discovery: A molecular Pathology Informatics network Symposium (photograph courtesy of Nophar Giefman)

Welcome slide from the Informatics for Stratified Medicine and Biomarker Discovery: A molecular Pathology Informatics network Symposium (photograph courtesy of Nophar Giefman)

There were also some fascinating presentations on breath-omics and text-mining support for biomarker discovery; the use of longitudinal data in stratified medicine and image analysis in digital histopathology. Professor Niels Peek, Director of the Greater Manchester Connected Healthy City, kicked off the afternoon with his captivating keynote speech on Learning Health Systems where he demonstrated the potential of using routine data to improve health systems.


Technical Managers in Universities Conference (from Natalie Homer)

The Technical Managers in Universities (TMU) is a national network of technical managers working in higher education and research. The theme of this years TMU conference was ‘The Changing Landscape for Technical Managers’, held at Nottingham University on 12th and 13th April 2018.

Dame Jessica Corner, Pro-vice chancellor of Nottingham University, gave a welcome address. She referred to the recent Academy of Medical Sciences recognition of ‘team science’ and initiatives to encourage inter-disciplinary use of equipment. Sir Martin Poliakoff, star of the Periodic Videos, gave the first keynote presentation titled ‘How Technician’s built my career’. In it he described in great detail all of the technicians that had contributed and enabled his career success.

 Sir Martin Poliakoff presenting at Technical Managers in Universities (TMU) conference in Nottingham (photograph courtesy of Natalie Homer)

Sir Martin Poliakoff presenting at Technical Managers in Universities (TMU) conference in Nottingham (photograph courtesy of Natalie Homer)

The launch of the ‘Technician’s Commitment’ in May 2017, signed by many leading universities, was a repeated theme throughout this conference. The Technician’s commitment has been set up by the Science Council in part to address the shortfall of technicians across the sector and to ensure visibility, recognition, career development and sustainability for technicians working in higher education and research. 

There were three workshop sessions which covered broad topics including Health and Safety, Apprenticeships, Mental Health, Athena SWAN & Technicians, Passivhaus (Energy Efficiency in Buildings), Strategies for Technical Services and an inspiring workshop on Outreach activities in Universities led by Technical staff.

Rob Hardwick, Senior Innovation and Skills manager from UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) introduced the forthcoming Action Plan for Technical Researchers, due later this year. He included results from a recent survey detailing figures such as the contribution of technical staff to academic papers, first authorship (20%), grant writing and critically the lack of a clear professional development path for technical staff. There are hopes to establish fellowships for technical specialists and the need to address the general lack of technical leadership in organisational structures within higher education.

 Technical Managers in Universities (TMU) conference booklet (photograph courtesy of Natalie Homer)

Technical Managers in Universities (TMU) conference booklet (photograph courtesy of Natalie Homer)

Prof Pete Licence, Professor of Chemistry and Director of the Carbon Neutral Laboratory at Nottingham University, gave a second keynote titled ‘The Importance of Being Earnest’. In his presentation he focused on the technical staff within the laboratory. He showcased the ground-breaking architecture of the building, its capabilities and the equally groundbreaking research being carried out within the Carbon Neutral Laboratory, much of it enabled and facilitated by technical staff.

Overall the conference championed technical staff within universities. Hopefully ongoing support for the Technician’s Commitment and the forthcoming Action Plan for Technical Researchers from UKRI will begin to address the growing shortfall in technical staff, and will recognise the invaluable contribution that technical staff make to successful teaching and research within higher education.


Industry Sponsors Webpage (from Naomi Rankin)

The SMN have invited sponsors of the SMN2018 symposium to contribute short articles for our new industry sponsors webpage. Please visit this page to learn more about new journals, methods, instruments and software available to support researchers in metabolomics. You can also click on the boxes to view vendor posters shown at SMN2017. If you have any more ideas for additions to the website, please e-mail Gavin Blackburn (gavin.blackburn@glasgow.ac.uk) or Sabine Freitag (sabine.Freitag@hutton.ac.uk). We would also like to highlight that if you add #ScotMetNet to your tweets it will automatically be shown on our twitter feed on the SMN home page.

If you want to become a member of the SMN, you need to be a metabolomics researcher based in Scotland. We also strongly recommend you become a member of the Metabolomics Society, if not already a member. Just send your name, title, affiliation and links to your own/laboratory profile so these can be added to the members page.

 Screenshot from the SMN website (http://scottishmetabolomics.net/industry-sponsors)

Screenshot from the SMN website (http://scottishmetabolomics.net/industry-sponsors)


Scottish Metabolomics Network Papers


Metabolomics (and other) Conferences and workshops (in date order)

Webinars


PhD Opportunities


Vacancies

·         Anatune GC-MS support engineer, UK based, closing date 01/06/2018


Thank you

Sabine Freitag at the James Hutton Institute in Dundee has now taken over the SMN newsletter. If you have anything you want to add to the next edition of the newsletter please e-mail Sabine.Freitag at hutton.ac.uk.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to the newsletter!


 

 

 

Previous Newsletters

February 2018 Newsletter

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2018 Advert (from Will Allwood and Jeffery Huang)
  • Laboratory of the Quarter: Hutton Lipidomics (and Proteomics) Research Facility at the University of the Highlands and Islands, Inverness (from Phil Whitfield)
  • Metabolomics Profiling Forum 2017 Birmingham Overview (from Karl Burgess)
  • Metabolomics Training at EMBL-EBI (Naomi Rankin)
  • Edinburgh CRF MS Core Update (from Ruth Andrew)
  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Papers
  • Metabolomics (and other) conferences
  • PhD studentships
  • Vacancies
  • Acknowledgements

 

November 2017 Newsletter

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2017 Special
    • Overview (Ruth Andrew)
    • Technical Sessions (Ruth Andrew and David Watson)
    • Biology Sessions (Ruth Andrew and Kevin Rattigan)
  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2018 Advert (Will Allwood and Jeffery Huang)
  • Laboratory of the Quarter: HuttonEnvironmental and Biochemical Sciences Group LC- and GC- MS metabolomics, lipidomics and volatile analysis facilities, James Hutton Institute (from Will Allwood)
  • Edinburgh Update (from Natalie Homer)

  • UK Clinical Research Facilities Network (from Natalie Homer)

  • Synthetic Biology Workshop in China (from Karl Burgess)


 

August 2017 Newsletter

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2017 Update (Naomi Rankin and Gavin Blackburn)
  • Laboratory of the Quarter: Cell Metabolism and Homeostasis Group and Metabolomics/Lipidomics Mass Spectrometry Group at the Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine (IGMM) (from Andy Finch)
  • Edinburgh Update (from Ruth Andrew and Natalie Homer)
  • UK Clinical Research Facilities Network (from Natalie Homer)
  • EPSRC UK National Mass Spectrometry Facility 30th Anniversary Symposium (from Natalie Homer)
  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Papers
  • Metabolomics (and other) conferences

May 2017 Newsletter

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Symposium 2017 Update (Naomi Rankin and Gavin Blackburn)
  • Metabolomics Training in South Africa (Karl Burgess)
  • NMR metabolomics training at EMBL-EBI (Naomi Rankin)
  • Updates from Edinburgh (Ruth Andrew)
  • Updates from the University of Glasgow (Naomi Rankin and Karl Burgess)
  • Papers from the Scottish Metabolomics Network
  • Metabolomics and other conferences

December 2016 Newsletter

Special issue on the Scottish Metabolomics Symposium 2016 in Inverness:

  • Overview (from Karl Burgess and Naomi Rankin)
  • Biology Sessions Overview (from Andrew Finch)
  • Technical Sessions Overview (from Natalie Homer)

September 2016 Newsletter

  • Scottish Metabolomics Network Updates (Karl Burgess)
  • Update on Symposium 2016 (Phil Whitfield)
  • Core expansion at Edinburgh CRF (Ruth Andrew)